Pictographic Drawings

Traditionally the First Peoples of the Plains recorded in pictographs personal and tribal history on rocks (dating back to prehistoric times) and later on tanned animal hides in the absence of the written word. To continue the much-valuedtradition of cultural expression the Native Americans began drawing in ledger books traded by the settlers and the military beginning in the mid-1800s. These drawings held great historic significance as they recorded the transformation of the Plains Indians’ traditional lives in the late nineteenth century, acting as pictorial storytelling.Today, pictographic drawings are still practiced as a contemporary art form. A handful of Native artists use multi-media (watercolor, ink, colored pencil and crayon etc.) to record events of the present and past. The preferred canvas continues to be antique ledger paper but not exclusively. 

DWAYNE WILCOX  I  LINDA HAUKAAS  I  STUART BRINGS PLENTY and more..

 

Stuart Brings Plenty
(Oglala)
Stuart Brings Plenty
(Oglala)
Stuart Brings Plenty
(Oglala)
Stuart Brings Plenty
(Oglala)
Stuart Brings Plenty
(Oglala)
Stuart Brings Plenty
(Oglala)
Jade Bread
(Apahce/Blackfeet)
Jade Bread
(Apahce/Blackfeet)

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